HIIT Treadmill Training Workout

HIIT Treadmill Training Workout

Ready to try HIIT on the treadmill? The two workouts below — created by Elizabeth Corkum, a USATF-certified running coach and owner of Coach Corky Runs in New York City — use speed and incline to vary intensity. Do each workout once per week for a simple treadmill training plan with all the benefits of HIIT.

How can you determine the best running pace for your HIIT treadmill workout? Gauge your intensity level on a scale of 0 to 10, where 0 is the equivalent of sitting and 10 is your absolute max effort. During your high-intensity intervals, you should be around a 9 or 10. “In HIIT, you get what you give — so you should be prepared to go really hard,” Corkum says.

If you’re new to HIIT — or you’ve never done HIIT training on a treadmill before — Corkum recommends testing out different running paces before starting your HIIT workout. It may take some trial and error to figure out what pace feels like a 6 and what pace feels like a 9 or 10.

hiit treadmill training- woman on treadmill

Workout 1: Flat Sprints

  • Jog at an easy pace for 5 minutes.
  • Run hard for 1 minute.
  • Recover by walking or jogging at an easy pace for 2 minutes.
  • Alternate between hard and easy intervals for a total of 6 to 8 rounds.
  • Jog at an easy pace for 5 minutes.

hiit treadmill training- woman alone on treadmill

Workout 2: Incline Intervals

  • Jog at an easy pace for 5 minutes.
  • Run at an easy to moderate pace at 0 percent incline for 2 minutes.
  • Maintain the same pace, but bring the incline grade up to 7 percent and run for 1 minute.
  • Return the incline to 0 percent and run for 2 minutes.
  • Alternate between hard and easy intervals for a total of 6 to 8 rounds.
  • Jog at an easy pace for 5 minutes.

How Many Days a Week Should You Do HIIT on the Treadmill?

You may want to limit your weekly HIIT sessions to avoid injury and overtraining, especially when you’re just starting out.

Corkum recommends performing two HIIT treadmill runs per week on nonconsecutive days. The remaining days should include a mix of steady-state cardio, strength training, and active recovery.

Lauren Bedosky

About

Lauren Bedosky is an experienced health and fitness writer who specializes in running, strength training, sports nutrition, and injury prevention. She writes for a variety of companies and publications, including Men’s Health, MyFitnessPal, Everyday Health, and BlueCross BlueShield. She lives in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota, with her husband and their three dogs. You can find here on Twitter here.

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